Table of Contents

Historical trends among cestode research of vertebrates in the Philippines

Review Paper (Taxonomy and Systematics)
Date Posted (Final Published Version) : September 10, 2018

by Vanessa V. Martinez and Jonathan Carlo A. Briones

Abstract

The study of cestodology has provided an increased understanding of global parasite epidemiology and has contributed to the decrease of human health risks caused by parasite infections. Research trends over past decades have proven that more species have yet to be discovered. An analysis of the trend of cestode studies among vertebrates in the Philippines is hereby presented in aspects of (1) peer-reviewed readership, (2) host taxa studied, (3) geographical distribution, and (3) target parasite species of interest. A survey of 182 publications in primary scientific and grey literature from 1904 to 2017 revealed that most studies were published locally. Likewise, a number of papers favored mammals, particularly humans, as the preferred vertebrate host of study. Looking into geographical distribution, a great number of publications focused on Luzon Island and was concentrated in Manila. Cestode species reported so far in the country belong to order Cyclophyllidea, with Taenia solium and T. saginata as the preferred species to be investigated. Looking into these, we suggest that a shift into the application of molecular systematics and biotechnology would further develop Philippine cestode research, given that the historical trend has focused on parasite discovery, identity, and classification. May this paper be a call to further fill the gaps in what is known about cestodes and other parasites in the Philippines, given the country’s potential for further discoveries.

KEYWORDS: Cyclophyllidea, parasite, Platyhelminthes, Taenia, tapeworm.

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New record of Phyllodiaptomus (Ctenodiaptomus) praedictus sulawensis Alekseev & Vaillant, 2013 (Hexanauplia, Copepoda, Calanoida, Diaptomidae) in the Philippines (Luzon Island)

Primary Research Paper (Taxonomy and Systematics)
Date Posted (Final Published Version) : October 16, 2018

by Shea Kathleen P. Guinto, Justine Val Jade B. Lacaba, John Kenneth V. Cuballes, Aezrile A. Igancio, Eric Zeus C. Rizo, Henri J. Dumont, Bo-Ping Han & Rey Donne S. Papa

Abstract

A study originally intended to update the taxonomy and distribution of calanoid copepods in selected freshwater ecosystems of Central Luzon has led to the discovery of a new record of Phyllodiaptomus Kiefer, 1936 in Candaba Swamp, Pampanga. Since 1979, the only calanoid copepods recorded from this area included Filipinodiaptomus insulanus (Wright S., 1928) and Tropodiaptomus australis Kiefer, 1936. Later studies on calanoid copepods in the region have since been non-existent. Analyses of pertinent key morphological characters revealed that the specimens at hand belonged to Phyllodiaptomus (Ctenodiaptomus) praedictus sulawensis Alekseev & Vaillant, 2013, a freshwater diaptomid calanoid copepod subspecies discovered and known to be endemic only in Indonesia. Provided in this paper are baseline information on the morphological characters of the Philippine members of the subspecies accompanied by line drawings as well as a comparison between the recorded morphological data presented by Alekseev, Haffner, Vaillant & Yusoff (2013) and the current dataset to support the identification of the specimen. The discovery of P. (C.) praedictus sulawensis in the Philippines, which was thought to be endemic in Indonesia, presents a new record of this species in the country and the first such record outside of its country of origin.

KEYWORDS: Candaba Swamp, Copepod, Indonesia, Inland Waters, Limnology, Thailand 

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What’s in a latin name?: Cycas wadei & the politics of nomenclature

Primary Research Paper (Taxonomy and Systematics)

Date Posted (Final Published Version) : February 6,2019

by Kathleen Cruz Gutierrez

Abstract

This history piece analyzes colonial-era correspondence and botany publications fascinated with Cycas wadei, a cycad observed only to grow on the island of Culion in the province of Palawan. First spotted in 1902 by U.S. botanist Elmer D. Merrill, the cycad became the preoccupation of U.S. and Filipino scientists alike. It took nearly three and a half decades before the species was introduced in the Philippine Journal of Science in 1936 as C. wadei, named after Herbert W. Wade, head physician of the Culion leper colony established by the U.S. colonial government at the turn of the century. Tracking the history of this species—from its first sighting to its debut before the international botany community—reveals much about the institutional workings of colonial science in the Philippines in the years leading up to the Commonwealth era. It further inspires us to take stock of the ways in which the politics of Latin binomial nomenclature of a species can be historicized across scales of human and institutional interaction. Such an intellectual practice can help us continue to shed light on the history of taxonomy in the Philippines.

KEYWORDS: cycads, taxonomy, Philippine history, Bureau of Science, U.S. colonialism

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Floral diversity assessment of the buffer zones and vicinity of the Mt. Hamiguitan Range Wildlife Sanctuary (MHRWS), Davao Oriental: basis for inclusion to protected area zone

Primary Research Paper (Diversity and Distribution)

Date Posted (Final Published Version) : March 16,2019

by Victor B. Amoroso, Florfe M. Acma, Fulgent P. Coritico, Felipe S. Gorme, Noel E. Lagunday, Mary Cor S. Salolog, and Ruel D. Colong

Abstract

In 2016, municipal ordinances to expand the protected area of the MHRWS were issued with the aim of protecting and preserving the remaining biodiversity of the buffer zones and to strengthen the core zone. The municipal ordinances however, have limitations and do not guarantee legal promulgation. Hence, this study is on the gathering of complete and concrete floral data so that these expansion sites will become part of the protected area and encompassed in legal promulgations. Botanical fieldworks conducted from Oct to Dec 2017 were carried out in five study sites of the MHRWS expansion sites using 40 20 x 20 m sampling plot with a distance of 20 m between plots and opportunistic transect walk techniques. The study disclosed 228 taxa of plants, of these, 74 species were ferns and lycophytes, 6 species of gymnosperms, 30 species of herbs and vines and 118 species were trees and shrubs. There were three new records of ferns and lycophytes increasing the number of species to 155. There are 13 (5.7%) threatened species, 22 (9.6%) and endemic species. Findings suggest that species in each site are unique and maybe attributed to the vegetation present, elevation variations of the different sampling sites and anthropogenic activities. The proposed expansion sites harbor diverse threatened and plants deserving protection and conservation efforts. Results of this study support the contention that the expansion sites, which are included in the municipal ordinances, be part of the official protected area.

KEYWORDS: biodiversity, Mt. Hamiguitan Range Wildlife Sanctuary expansion sites, Mindanao, Philippines, buffer zone

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The Negros Ark: A Hypothesis
The systematics and biogeography of Rhopalocera (Lepidoptera) in the Philippines

Review Paper (Diversity and Distribution)

Date Posted (Final Published Version) : March 29,2019

by Jade Aster T. Badon

Abstract

Current distributional data on Philippine butterflies suggests that colonization and exchange of species between Luzon and Mindanao are hypothesized to have occurred during the Miocene Epoch (23-5.3 million years ago). Species from the families Pieridae, Hesperiidae, and Zygaenidae were set as an example to explain some disjunction of distribution of some species in the archipelago. The hypothesis will definitely become an interest in the field of biogeographical and phylogenetic studies in the country.

KEYWORDS: butterfly, colonization, biogeography

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Identification of archaeological charred wood from Ille site,
El Nido, Palawan, Philippines

Primary Research Paper (Diversity and Distribution)

Date Posted (Final Published Version) : March 29,2019

by Jane B. Carlos, Ramiro P. Escobin, Jennifer Conda, Mario D.R. Ramos, Helen Lewis and Victor J. Paz

Abstract

Seven charred wood fragments from the archaeological site of Ille in El Nido, Palawan were identified as an undetermined monocot and representatives of the families Caesalpiniaceae, Dipterocarpaceae, and Araucariaceae/Podocarpaceae. Though very few pieces were determined, the results gave a glimpse of the types of woody plants most likely present in the vicinity of Ille, 14,000 to around 4,000 years ago. This report also aims to provide taxonomic identification based on the available literature to serve as baseline information for future use.

KEYWORDS: anthracology, archaeobotany, hardwood, softwood, monocotyledon

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